Umbrellas for D
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likeafieldmouse:

Kilian Eng

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50watts:

Oh 1981 (Shigenari Onishi)

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paxmachina:

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)
An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.


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paxmachina:

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

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chaplinfortheages:

claroscureaux:

Mabel Normand as Suzanna (1923)

Charlie Chaplin thought very fondly of Mabel Normand. She was his greatest supporter during his Keystone year. They had amazing screen chemistry - very different than the one he had with Edna Purviance. Mabel & Charlie’s onscreen were more like equals - she took no stuff from the guys and gave back as good as she got. 
When Mabel passed in 1930 Charlie Chaplin was one of her pallbearers. A story told in Lillian Ross’s “Moment with Chaplin”:

Looking at his 4 year old daughter Josephine – “This one looks just like Mabel Normand,” Remember her?”  “Sweet Mabel,: Chaplin said, and he gave a little laugh.


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chaplinfortheages:

claroscureaux:

Mabel Normand as Suzanna (1923)

Charlie Chaplin thought very fondly of Mabel Normand. She was his greatest supporter during his Keystone year. They had amazing screen chemistry - very different than the one he had with Edna Purviance. Mabel & Charlie’s onscreen were more like equals - she took no stuff from the guys and gave back as good as she got. 

When Mabel passed in 1930 Charlie Chaplin was one of her pallbearers. A story told in Lillian Ross’s “Moment with Chaplin”:

Looking at his 4 year old daughter Josephine – “This one looks just like Mabel Normand,” Remember her?”  “Sweet Mabel,: Chaplin said, and he gave a little laugh.

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I had asked Jolie a few days ago if I could fly with her, and she told me she had never taken a passenger up before but would think about it. When I arrived at the photo shoot, I told her that I mentioned to my mother that I might fly with her and that my mother did not like the idea one bit. Jolie laughed it off. Now, as I am watching her kick off her stilettos (she pilots barefoot) and step up onto the wing of her little white plane, she stops for a second and stares at me standing off to the side. There is a glint in her eye. A big smile spreads across her face. “Let’s go scare your mother,” she says.

Only as I am jammed in the back next to Leibovitz, bumping along the dinky little runway, does the reality of what I’m doing sink in. I imagine the headline: ANGELINA JOLIE AND ANNIE LEIBOVITZ DIE IN PLANE CRASH NEAR LAS VEGAS. I try to remember who went down with Patsy Cline, but I can’t. I am about to become a trivia question. I tell myself this will be a suitably fabulous way to die, and just like that we are in the air, floating above the desert, and my nerves are gone. “I’ll do some tight turns,” says Jolie. “Maddox likes it when there are g-forces.” [x]

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Marilyn Monroe photographed by Douglas Kirkland, 1961.

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Marilyn Monroe photographed by Douglas Kirkland, 1961.

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theyroaredvintage:

Photo by Joseph Szabo, 1970s/1980s.

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theyroaredvintage:

Photo by Joseph Szabo, 1970s/1980s.

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mesineto:

 
 Collaboration with Michael Tunk
*Check out the beautiful work of Michael Tunk
http://michaeltunk.tumblr.com/

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mesineto:

 

 Collaboration with Michael Tunk

*Check out the beautiful work of Michael Tunk

http://michaeltunk.tumblr.com/

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