Umbrellas for D
red-lipstick:

John Kenn aka John Kenn Mortensen aka Don Kenn (Danish, b. 1978, Denmark) - Untitled    Drawings: Pencils

red-lipstick:

John Kenn aka John Kenn Mortensen aka Don Kenn (Danish, b. 1978, Denmark) - Untitled    Drawings: Pencils

arsvitaest:

Bronze statuette of a horse, Greek, late 2nd–1st century BCThe Metropolitan Museum of Art

arsvitaest:

Bronze statuette of a horse, Greek, late 2nd1st century BC
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

not an umbrella

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

not an umbrella

coolchicksfromhistory:

Emily Geiger
Art by Anna Tewungwa (tumblr, instagram) 
Emily Geiger was a teenager from South Carolina who volunteered to deliver a message across enemy lines for General Nathaniel Greene during the Revolutionary War.  The mission was dangerous and Emily was intercepted by British scouts.  She was arrested, but before she was searched Emily managed to eat General Greene’s message.  As the British could find no evidence on which to hold her, Emily was released.  But General Greene’s message was not lost.  Emily memorized the message before she left home and after her release she verbally delivered the message to General Thomas Sumter.

not an umbrella

coolchicksfromhistory:

Emily Geiger

Art by Anna Tewungwa (tumblr, instagram

Emily Geiger was a teenager from South Carolina who volunteered to deliver a message across enemy lines for General Nathaniel Greene during the Revolutionary War.  The mission was dangerous and Emily was intercepted by British scouts.  She was arrested, but before she was searched Emily managed to eat General Greene’s message.  As the British could find no evidence on which to hold her, Emily was released.  But General Greene’s message was not lost.  Emily memorized the message before she left home and after her release she verbally delivered the message to General Thomas Sumter.

not an umbrella

hollyhocksandtulips:

Sand Surfing, 1955

not an umbrella

hollyhocksandtulips:

Sand Surfing, 1955

not an umbrella

Not an umbrella

Not an umbrella

jai-envie-detoi:

Tea Ceremony
Photographer: kumba

Not an umbrella

jai-envie-detoi:

Tea Ceremony

Photographer: kumba

Not an umbrella

the-hulot-universe:

L’Ecole du Regard IVRon Ulicny This is a Pipe No.2

not an umbrella

the-hulot-universe:

L’Ecole du Regard IV

Ron Ulicny This is a Pipe No.2

not an umbrella

v-magazine:

#NiceAds 👏 New from @mulberry_editor starring @caradelevingne


Not an umbrella

v-magazine:

#NiceAds 👏 New from @mulberry_editor starring @caradelevingne

Not an umbrella

fairytalemood:

"Beauty and the Beast" by Diana Latuga

Not an umbrella

fairytalemood:

"Beauty and the Beast" by Diana Latuga

Not an umbrella